Don’t buy a Tesla!

Written on 8 December 2018, 10:02pm

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TL;DR: The Model S is a great car and it offers you an extraordinary driving experience. Tesla customer service in Europe (more specifically in Belgium) is dreadful. Tesla doesn’t take security seriously and the Model S doesn’t seem to be very mature yet. I am still loving my Model S.

The statements above are not mutually exclusive. I’m loving it, but I don’t recommend buying one. Not for the moment at least. Customer care is part of the experience of owning a car, and Tesla does it badly here in Europe. 

More details about my statements above:

  • if you plan to call your customer service, expect waiting times in the region 1-2 hours. Yes, you read that right. Freaking hours, on the phone.
  • if you get in touch with someone from support, there’s no guarantee that they will actually do something to help. Recent example: called to report a problem with the left mirror. After an hour of waiting, I am told to send an email to the technical team, and they will reach back to me. That was 2 weeks ago. Nobody called.
  • the Model S is not mature enough. As a technical guy, I am used to technical issues. I see my Model S as a computer on wheels, so a few non-safety related bugs are tolerable. Resetting your car to fix the air conditioning flow or the internet connectivity is fine for me. But when these things start to happen on a regular basis, things can get annoying. Especially when Tesla doesn’t seem to care about it.
  • the Model S’s produced before June 2018 have a known vulnerability that can lead to the car being stolen with minimal effort. The solution is simple: upgrade the chip on the key fobs and re-link them with your car. Tesla fixed this problem for the cars produced after June 2018, but is asking the existing owners (pre-June 2018) to pay for the fix from their own pocket (about 250 EUR). The alternative recommended by Tesla is to disable the Passive Entry. Because that’s the normal thing to do after you sell a $100k+ car with a security hole in it: ask the customer to disable a feature for which he already paid. But hey, they take security seriously…

All that being said, I still love to drive my Model S. But I don’t recommend  anyone buying one. There are other electric car producers out there. Look for one that actually gives a s*it about you. Unfortunately Tesla is not one of them. Yet.

Distinct Apple IDs for the same GMail account

Written on 28 January 2017, 02:45pm

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It’s probably well known by now the fact that when you create a GMail account, any periods (dot characters) in your username will be ignored by GMail:

If you have a personal account (typically ending in gmail.com), it doesn’t matter if people type the period in your username or not.
For example, emails to all of these addresses will be delivered to the same Gmail account:
johnsmith@gmail.com
jo.hn.smith@gmail.com
john.smith@gmail.com
https://support.google.com/mail/answer/10313?hl=en

What is the impact of this feature on the creation of new Apple IDs?
Well, for Apple the 3 email addresses above are distinct, so they will allow to create 3 separate Apple IDs with the 3 email addresses. During the Apple ID registration process, an email with the subject Verify your Apple ID email address will be sent to confirm the ownership of the email address. Naturally, in all the 3 cases above, the 3 emails will be delivered to the same GMail account.

This is already a bit awkward, but I guess it’s something that does not create any problems, so Apple had no reason to work around it.
The real problem is described below.
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