10 things that I liked in 2021

Written on 31 December 2021, 03:37pm

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For the fifth year running, the periodic roundup of things that I enjoyed in 2021. Might not be 10 in the end…

  1. Reading. I made a conscious effort and created the environment to read more books. 5 times more than in 2020, according to Goodreads.
  2. Listening. Sonos, Airpods Pro, the in-car entertainment system and more recently, the Sony wh-1000xm4 headphones are great (Sony – probably the only company where engineers get to name the products)
  3. Learning more about aviation (from Admiral_Cloudberg, among others) and space
  4. Refereeing. A bit ironic, considering my take on non-human football referees 🙂
  5. Sticking to a routine. 662 days and counting…
  6. Viewing my pictures on the Google Nest Hub.
  7. Not worrying too much that there are not 10 things in this list…

Weekly links #2

Written on 12 October 2015, 08:34am

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Apple Camera?

I, for one, would love to see Apple develop an iPhone 7P. The “P” is for photography. Add back 2mm to the device’s profile, which would enable a larger battery, and install an even better camera (bigger lens, bigger sensor) for people who love photography. I would easily pay a $100 premium for the specialized device. I have to think they would sell more of these than the iPhone 6c.
The One Thing Apple Understands is Photography
plus 5 reasons Apple should make a professional camera

Jony-ive-leica-1200x904

An European alternative to Soylent:

Update, 1 month later: I could not get used to the taste. And I’m sorry about that, the prospect was extremely appealing 🙁

Eating a diet considered healthy by scientific standards is difficult. These requirements can only be met with a varied and well thought out diet.
We have developed a formula which combines all nutrients recommended by dietitians in a powder, which we call BERTRAND.
http://bertrand.bio/

spoon_powder

Security Keys

With 2-Step Verification, Google requires something you know (your password) and something you have (like your phone) to sign in. Google sends a verification code to your phone when you try to sign in to confirm it’s you. However, sophisticated attackers could set up lookalike sites that ask you to provide your verification codes to them, instead of Google. Security Key offers better protection against this kind of attack, because it uses cryptography instead of verification codes and automatically works only with the website it’s supposed to work with.
Using Security Key for 2-Step Verification

A few notes about security keys in general and YubiKey in particular:
– the security keys do not need batteries or mobile connectivity (as the cell phones receiving security codes)
– full YubiKey product lineup
– the blue YubiKey implements the U2F standard and works with GMail, Dropbox and GitHub
– the most expensive YubiKey version works also via NFC with the supported devices
– the other ones must rely on a recent Chrome version and on a device with an USB port
– if the security key is not available, the normal security codes (received on cell phones) still work
yubi keys

YNWA