Make the questions easy to answer

Written on 7 March 2017, 11:30pm

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About a month ago I was asking MalwareBytes to stop making me think.
I recently read for the 3rd time Don’t make me think (but actually the first time the paperback version πŸ™‚ ) and I found a reference to another excellent book: Forms that work: Designing Web Forms for Usability.
I am at Chapter 3 – Making questions easy to answer – and there is the exact same situation as the one I encountered last month. The heading is ‘Turn negative questions into positive ones’, and I take the liberty to post the relevant paragraph here:


Happy to see this kind of confirmation πŸ™‚

PS – Go buy the book! 30 EUR well spent. And it also comes with a companion site: formsthatwork.com

Wireframing

Written on 30 December 2016, 10:38pm

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These are some notes that I took while skim-reading The Guide to Wireframing.

What are wireframes?
Wireframes connect the conceptual structure to the visual design of a website/app.
They communicate 3 main points:
– Content
– Structure / Information Hierarchy
– Behavior / Functionality

How to do wireframes?
– paper drawing (sketching)
– whiteboard drawing
– paper kits (cutouts)
– digital drawing (Wacom devices)
– word processing software (Word, Google Docs, etc)
– presentation software: PowerPoint, Keynote
– graphic design tools: Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Sketch
– dedicated wireframing and prototyping tools: Balsamiq, proto.io, Axure, UXPin, InVision

Advantages of the dedicated wireframing tools
– element libraries
– flowcharting and user flows
– interaction with the wireframe: some wireframing tools offer the possibility to interact with the wireframes in order to showcase the behaviour (click-thgrough experience)
– collaboration (comments, feedback)
– presentation (pdf/ppt or standalone presentation mode)

Final point to remember
Delivering wireframes is not a goal in itself. The goal of wireframing is to deliver the final product, not the wirefames. So don’t aim for the perfect wireframe: as long as your wireframe delivers the intended message, move on.

A/B, MVT testing and usability

Written on 30 March 2015, 10:31pm

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Some quick notes after reading A field guide to usability testing and re-reading the Smashing Book #1:

1. A/B testing

– always test both versions simultaneously
– wait for it πŸ™‚ (use a calculator to determine when to end it, and don’t give up earlier)
– keep the A/B tests for new visitors only (don’t surprise the regulars)
– but make sure that a new visitor gets the same version on consecutive visits
– be consistent: make sure that the variation appears on all pages (ex – if you have a promotional price on version A, make sure that the user will always see the promotional price on all the pages)
– the results might be un-intuitive
– naturally, the higher the number of users, the more reliable the result
More

Who would be involved in an A/B test:
the UI/UX team – to propose the 2 versions and analyze the metric results
the dev team – to implement the metric, manage sessions and make changes consistent across all the interfaces
the network team – to handle various types of redirects (ex – run the A/B test only for users in a given geographical area, or only users on mobile)

2. MVT (multi variate testing)

– it needs a lot of traffic and time
– keep the number of combinations to 25 or less and make sure you preview them all
– global vs local optimum (A/B vs MVT)
– if you don’t have the traffic and cannot use full factorial testing, you can still use partial factorial testing.

3. Some usability rules/principles

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