When I come across charts like this, this or this, my reaction is to point to obvious: that the information is unreadable by 1 in 12 men and in 1 in 200 women. Being one of them certainly helps to see the problem 🙂
Pointing it out is certainly good for raising awareness, but it’s not enough. Driving change is what ultimately matters. And the good news is, in most cases the change is really easy. So easy that I can resume it to two action points:

1. Don’t use color alone to convey meaning. Use icons, written content, and other visual elements to reinforce clear communication of the content.

https://accessibility.digital.gov/visual-design/color-and-contrast/


2. Make sure there’s sufficient contrast between graph colors so people with color blindness can distinguish the colors.

https://accessibility.digital.gov/visual-design/data-visualizations/

That’s it! Seriously. Add some symbols to your chart bars and pick a colorblind-friendly palette. Implementing the two points above will make your data visualization efforts more inclusive. If you want to go the extra mile and show some empathy, then

Test what it’s like to view your designs through a color blindness simulator

https://accessibility.digital.gov/visual-design/color-and-contrast/
https://uxdesign.cc/designing-for-accessibility-is-not-that-hard-c04cc4779d94

The take away here is that “Designing for accessibility is not that hard“. As in the case of football, “This is not rocket science. It’s really about easy fixes“:

Enterprise Cyber Security – post-event notes

Written on 23 September 2018, 04:22pm

Tagged with: , , ,

Some notes following the Enterprise Cyber Security Europe event, 19 September 2018, Amsterdam.

  • @ThomLangford: When trying to hire, look for passion. Technical skills can be taught later on. Also, look for the people who care about what they do, who are full of energy, who are constantly pushing their limits and who are filled with passion. 
  • Humans are indeed the weakest link in any security system, because brains are hard to upgrade and because emotional manipulation is easy. 
  • So how do you deal with the human risk? 3 possible avenues:
    • throw technology at it
    • improve your internal processes (ex: out of band validation)
    • or develop a continuous and adaptive security awareness program, where people at Terranova seem to know what they are doing. 
  • Awareness is for everybody, training is for similar groups of people (ex. a department), education is for the ones who genuinely want to learn
  • The story of the women codebreakers at Bletchley Park is fascinating
  • Total cyber crime revenues: in the region of $1.5 trillion annually
  • Time to detect a data breach: between 99 and 197 days depending on who you ask. Either way, it feels like an eternity
  • You can actually turn a data breach into a positive development for your organisation if you manage to be humble, transparent and willing to improve things
  • Booking.com is having an interesting ‘everything is a test‘ culture (over 1000 experiments going live at any given time). The company brands itself as a ‘developer-first enterprise’. You must make an effort to find a compromise solution between security and usability
  • Preparing for the GDPR should have been easy as long as you have a user-oriented mindset. Don’t forget about the tools for user data export and user data deletion.
Over Amstel, close to the venue

Understanding security controls

Written on 23 September 2018, 03:39pm

Tagged with: , , , ,

How can you better understand the types of security controls than putting them into an example? Home security in this case.

Deterrent controls: a sticker on the front window saying that the house is linked to a security center.  Or a dog house. 

Preventive controls: locks on the access doors and windows. And a big dog. PS: defense in depth is critical.

Detective controls: security cameras calling up the monitoring center and/or the owner smartphone. Or a dog who never sleeps and who barks really loud. PS: detective controls imply that an attack has begun.

Corrective controls: a loud, indoor siren and a system that blinks the house lights when an intrusion is detected. Or a dog that can bring more bad dogs to save the day. PS: corrective controls react to an attack

Compensating controls: motion sensors on the outside of the building and on all the floors, on top of the ones installed on the ground floor. Or a second dog. PS: compensating controls are added after identifying deficiencies in existing controls

Image: https://www.tomalsojerry.com/tom-jerry-solid-serenade/